The O’s and Camden Yards crime: A guest post written by “The Intern,” who for the sake of his legal career will remain anonymous

The Boys of Summer are back in Baltimore, and so far they are even winning ballgames. Winning baseball games has unfortunately become an abnormality in the Charm City, a town that has become more well known for the HBO Series The Wire than its once-rich tradition of pennants and trophies. However, there is another Orioles’ tradition that continues to thrive. That is the tradition of drunken half-naked fans scampering incoherently and belligerently on the baseball diamond before being smothered into the pitch.  Your Maryland lawyer wants you to know of the history of crimes at Camden Yards and what possible consequences you might face if charged with a crime.

Motives are immaterial

Camden Yards streakers have a 20-year history of other motives besides the basic 15 seconds of fame. The rationale of past Camden yards Streakers’ have included everything from expensive wagers with friends to political protests. In 1999, when the Cuban All-Star team made the historic visit to Camden Yards, four fans ran onto the field yielding signs of protest against Cuban dictator, Fidel Castro. The actions so offended one of the Cuban umpires that the unbiased referee subsequently lifted the fan turned protestor over his head and threw him to the ground in a move usually reserved for the WWE. Read the article.

Breaking the Streak

This year, we have already seen four fans run onto the field including Batman and a SportsCenter Top 10 highlight of an umpire taking matters into in his own hands. Fan favorite Adam Jones has begun

"Batman Begins" the season

advocating for the use of tasers, a practice that has become as iconic to Philadelphia as the Philly Cheesesteak. So before consuming that last beer to put you over the fence, you might want to think through the consequences beyond getting a tackle that is normally seen by #52 or even tasered.

If you chose to slide – slide carefully

The most recent fan is suffering from more than just dirt burns and hangovers after his slide into home plate. He is looking at being charged with several crimes.  According to the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s Office and the Orioles, fan disturbances will not be tolerated.  Your Maryland lawyer wants you to know what charges may coincide with your 15 seconds of infamy:

Criminal Law Article § 10-201. Disturbing the public peace and disorderly conduct

(c) Prohibited. — (1) A person may not willfully and without lawful purpose obstruct or hinder the free passage of another in a public place or on a public conveyance.  (2) A person may not willfully act in a disorderly manner that disturbs the public peace.

(3) A person may not willfully fail to obey a reasonable and lawful order that a law enforcement officer makes to prevent a disturbance to the public peace.

(4) A person who enters the land or premises of another, whether an owner or lessee or a beach adjacent to the residential riparian property, may not willfully:

(i) disturb the peace of persons on the land, premises, or beach by making an unreasonably loud noise; or

(ii) act in a disorderly manner.

(5) A person from any location may not, by making an unreasonably loud noise, willfully disturb the peace of another:

(i) on the other’s land or premises;

(ii) in a public place; or

(iii) on a public conveyance.

(6) In Worcester County, a person may not build a bonfire or allow a bonfire to burn on a beach or other property between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m.

(d) Penalty. — A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to imprisonment not exceeding 60 days or a fine not exceeding $ 500 or both.

Criminal Law Article § 10-203. Interference with commercial athletic event

(b) Prohibited. — A person may not disrupt or interfere with a commercial athletic contest by throwing or projecting an object on the playing field or seating area.
(c) Penalty. — A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to imprisonment not exceeding 3 months or a fine not exceeding $ 250 or both.

Criminal Law Article § 6-402. Trespass on posted property

A person may not enter or trespass on the property that is posted conspicuously against trespass

(1) signs placed where they reasonably may be seen; or

(2) paint marks that:

(i) conform with regulations that the Department of Natural Resources adopts under § 5-209 of the Natural Resources Article; and

(ii) are made on trees or posts that are located:

1. at each road entrance to the property; and

2. adjacent to public roadways, public waterways, and other land adjoining the property.

A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to:

(1) For a first violation, imprisonment not exceeding 90 days or a fine not exceeding $500 or both;

(2) for a second violation occurring within 2 years after the first violation, imprisonment not exceeding 6 months or a fine not exceeding $1,000 or both; and

(3) For each subsequent violation occurring within 2 years after the preceding violation, imprisonment not exceeding 1 year or a fine not exceeding $2,500 or both”.

No Drunk Tank

Another important thing to remember is that unlike M&T Bank Stadium, Camden Yards does not have a holding room better known as the “drunk tank.” In a recent game at Camden Yards, 48 fans were ejected from the stadium for various alcohol-related incidents.  Generally those fans are ejected for life from Orioles property.

Any Maryland lawyer would agree: Don’t mess with #8

Although a good Maryland lawyer’s job is to defend his or her clients, I think we can all agree that messing with Cal Ripken, Jr. (the Ironman) is pretty low.  Probably the most notable crime to come out of Camden Yards over its 20 years was the theft of the aluminum number ”8” statute standing on Eutaw Street to honor Oriole great Cal Ripken, Jr (also featured prominently on ENlawyers website). This statue was stolen from outside the park by four teenagers who, according to the police, were “juiced up on alcohol.” The four individuals were charged with theft and destruction of property. They were found guilty.

Criminal Law Article  §7-104 A person convicted of theft of property or services

with a value of less than $1,000, is guilty of a misdemeanor and:

(i) is subject to imprisonment not exceeding 18 months or a fine not exceeding $500 or both; and

(ii) Shall restore the property taken to the owner or pay the owner the value of the property or services

How should you enjoy the O’s breaking their streak?

So the next time you and your friends are visiting The Yard and after you just guzzled down your 8th beer and you feel like being “you tubed” if arrested for these crimes, DON’T be one of the Camden Yards Streakers!  But IF YOU DO, make sure to tell the police officer you would like to call ENLawyers right away.